“Windows Program Compatibility mode is on. Turn it off and then try Setup again.” – How to uninstall an app if this happens.


I tried uninstalling an application (in my case, I was uninstalling Visual Studio 2012 RC), and I kept getting this error.

Following the logs and the help file got me nowhere, and neither did searching all over the internet for instructions on how to uninstall this using a tool or the registry or whatever.

Disabling the program compatibility service also does not work.

It turns out that setup.exe was marked to run in Compatibility Mode, which is what was stopping me from uninstalling.

So my mission was now to find where the uninstall package actually is on my hard drive and to check what the compatibility settings are.

This is simple: (instructions are for uninstalling on Windows 8)

  1. Run the uninstaller until it fails
  2. Go to task manager
  3. Call up the context menu for the installer process (right-click)
  4. Select ‘open file location’
  5. This will open the package folder
  6. Call up the context menu for the uninstaller executable
  7. Select the ‘compatibility’ tab
  8. Disable all compatibility settings over here
  9. ~the end~

I hope this helps someone!

 

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How to Uninstall ContinuousTests


For anyone who has played with Greg Young‘s amazing Visual Studio tool ContinuousTests, you may have discovered that uninstalling it tends to leave a ghosted menu option which seems impossible to remove.  I’m now on a mission to remove this!

Removing it turns out to be quite simple :)

  1. Right-click near your menu bar or speed buttons
  2. Select ‘Customize…’
  3. Select the ‘Commands’ tab
  4. In the list, select ‘ContinuousTests’
  5. Click ‘Delete’

All done :)

It turns out that as at the time of writing, the uninstaller removes all the menu items, but not the menu itself.

windows 8 hyper-v


So I tried installing Hyper-V on my Intel Xeon Quad-Core laptop… one would think that this would be possible.

Turns out that Microsoft’s promise of Windows 8 running fully on hardware that can run Windows 7 does have its limitations.

I headed to the familiar ‘Turn Windows Features on or off’ dialog, and tried installing Hyper-V Core, but this was disabled… further digging around unearthed some unpleasant details.

Hyper-V Core, the integral part of Hyper-V, requires a new virtualisation processor feature known as SLAT.  Microsoft has documented a list of SLAT-Capable cpus here -> http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/1401.aspx

Unfortunately mine is not listed there.

So if anyone was planning (as was I) to install the Dev Preview and have a VM of Windows 7 running on it, think again, and try an alternative solution, such as Oracle’s VirtualBox.